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EXCERPT:

 

   How do we explain physical reality?  Where do we start, and with what do we begin, in order to take even the first step toward an explanation?  In explaining physical reality, do we really have anything else, except it, with which to initiate that explanation?  Is there ever anything else, except physical reality?  We might think there is more, perhaps by believing that our thoughts, memories, feelings, or dreams exist, somehow independently from physical reality.  In so believing, we ignore that we cannot even ‘imagine’ anything independent of physical reality (though we might, quite mistakenly, believe otherwise), any more than we can think, feel, or dream independently of it, because physical reality includes even the motions of our very thoughts, memories, feelings, and dreams, themselves, which are ALL also, just as physical – every bit as much – as anything in the universe. 

   “To even consider, legitimately, that our thoughts, memories, feelings, or dreams are somehow nonphysical, one must first identify precisely what it means for them, or for anything, to be so, and how, being nonphysical in character, they nonetheless express themselves in the most overtly physical ways – like speaking, that, so clearly being motion, makes all of our thoughts, memories, feelings, and dreams no less physical than any overt human action is; no less than ANY other kind of physical motion whatsoever in the universe is.  Stating matters clearly, anything that we might imagine being nonphysical affecting reality simply does not exist. 

   So, because physical reality is all that we really have (since, as stated, anything else cannot ever be expressed, described, or manifest in any other way except a physical one), we must choose physical reality’s observation as the first step toward its explanation.  If we do not choose observation as a first step, then we must choose either not to explain physical reality, or choose something 'else', though there seems to be nothing else that we can use that isn't its observation, by which to do so.  If we choose the latter, that is, choose something ‘else’, besides observation for explaining, we choose something that cannot, of course, ever be observed at all, not even indirectly (though we’re free to ‘believe’ otherwise). 

   In choosing observation, we choose something that we cannot really even imagine outside of the physical terms of the observations (or any permutations thereof: allegory) that are an outcome of our life experience or rearrangements and distortions of such experiences (as innate interpretive responses to these observations).  By choosing observation, as the first step toward explaining physical reality, we implicitly assume that physical reality is 'made' of what we observe, even if what we observe consists (as stated) only of what we think, or remember, or feel emotionally, or dream.  We further assume that physical reality, besides being made of all these things we observe ‘within’ ourselves, is made also of all those things that we observe outside of ourselves, through our sensory awareness. 

   “Thus, we begin, by assuming that physical reality is made of all things observed, be they observed internally or externally, directly (like seeing the print on the page that you are now reading) or indirectly (like seeing the reflection of ourselves [or anything], looking into a mirror).  In this way, we can use physical reality as a first step, so that it can explain itself, through our embracing its observation, in the most rigorous way that we can.  We will use physical reality, along with that part of it that is our imagination, as precisely as our current understanding allows, for describing our very observations themselves and the relationships existing between these observations (in a predictable and reproducible manner), which is what any meaningful explanation of physical reality must do, for it to explain anything that is genuinely, materially real (i.e. physically existing outside of our imagination).

The Quotable Chongo:

ON HOW TO BE BITCHIN

Volume One

The title says it all. It is the book that all have been waiting for, finally here … that is, the first volume. (More volumes will follow.)

 

 

 

 

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EXCERPTS:

 

 

 

 “In the life of a man, his time is but a moment, his bearing an incessant flux, his senses a dim flash of light, his body a prey for worms, his soul an unquiet eddy, his fortune dark, and his fame doubtful. 

In short, all that is of the body is like flowing water, all that is of the soul as dreams and vapors; life a warfare, a brief sojourning in an alien land, and after[ward] oblivion.

Where then can man find the power to guide and guard his steps? 

In one thing and one alone: the love of knowledge*.”

–Marcus Aurelius*, emperor of Rome, Meditations

 

 

 

* - Understanding is, unquestionably, the most essential element of all for bitchin-ness – except, of course,  for the equally essential element of the outstandingly good fortune of opportunity.

 

 

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If you love something else other than a living organism more than a living organism, then love is not important enough.

 

 

 

 

If truth is anything but more important than what you want truth to be, then truth is not important enough.

 

 

 

 

Trying to be bitchin can come at the risk of being instead, a complete fool. But, not trying at all, and hence never risking being a fool, can come at the price of never being bitchin even once.

 

 

 

 

If you wash your hands frequently, then you get more babes … and you live longer (a fact) … which means that you can get even more babes.

 

 

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Photo by Dean Fidelman

 

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© 2008 C. Tucker (Chongo)

All rights reserved.

 

 

 

EXCERPT:

 

How do we explain physical reality?  Where do we start, and with what do we begin, in order to take even the first step toward an explanation?  In explaining physical reality, do we really have anything else, except it, with which to initiate that explanation?  Is there ever anything else, except physical reality?  We might think there is more, perhaps by believing that our thoughts, memories, feelings, or dreams exist, somehow independently from physical reality.  In so believing, we ignore that we cannot even ‘imagine’ anything independent of physical reality (though we might, quite mistakenly, believe otherwise), any more than we can think, feel, or dream independently of it, because physical reality includes even the motions of our very thoughts, memories, feelings, and dreams, themselves, which are ALL also, just as physical – every bit as much – as anything in the universe.

“To even consider, legitimately, that our thoughts, memories, feelings, or dreams are somehow nonphysical, one must first identify precisely what it means for them, or for anything, to be so, and how, being nonphysical in character, they nonetheless express themselves in the most overtly physical ways – like speaking, that, so clearly being motion, makes all of our thoughts, memories, feelings, and dreams no less physical than any overt human action is; no less than ANY other kind of physical motion whatsoever in the universe is.  Stating matters clearly, anything that we might imagine being nonphysical affecting reality simply does not exist.

So, because physical reality is all that we really have (since, as stated, anything else cannot ever be expressed, described, or manifest in any other way except a physical one), we must choose physical reality’s observation as the first step toward its explanation.  If we do not choose observation as a first step, then we must choose either not to explain physical reality, or choose something 'else', though there seems to be nothing else that we can use that isn't its observation, by which to do so.  If we choose the latter, that is, choose something ‘else’, besides observation for explaining, we choose something that cannot, of course, ever be observed at all, not even indirectly (though we’re free to ‘believe’ otherwise).

In choosing observation, we choose something that we cannot really even imagine outside of the physical terms of the observations (or any permutations thereof: allegory) that are an outcome of our life experience or rearrangements and distortions of such experiences (as innate interpretive responses to these observations).  By choosing observation, as the first step toward explaining physical reality, we implicitly assume that physical reality is 'made' of what we observe, even if what we observe consists (as stated) only of what we think, or remember, or feel emotionally, or dream.  We further assume that physical reality, besides being made of all these things we observe ‘within’ ourselves, is made also of all those things that we observe outside of ourselves, through our sensory awareness.

“Thus, we begin, by assuming that physical reality is made of all things observed, be they observed internally or externally, directly (like seeing the print on the page that you are now reading) or indirectly (like seeing the reflection of ourselves [or anything], looking into a mirror).  In this way, we can use physical reality as a first step, so that it can explain itself, through our embracing its observation, in the most rigorous way that we can.  We will use physical reality, along with that part of it that is our imagination, as precisely as our current understanding allows, for describing our very observations themselves and the relationships existing between these observations (in a predictable and reproducible manner), which is what any meaningful explanation of physical reality must do, for it to explain anything that is genuinely, materially real (i.e. physically existing outside of our imagination).